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Weight Loss Surgery – who needs it?

November 2nd, 2011 | Posted by Sue in Lifestyle | Patients | Weight loss program

Carrying extra weight is more than just a problem with what others see of you, of making clothes look good, or fitting in with the crowd. It can also be a health hazard.

Your weight in kilograms does not tell the whole story – indeed, muscle contributes to kilograms, but does not impair your health. So, while health professionals often use your weight to measure your health risks, we always do so only as part of the bigger picture.

Your Body Mass Index is really only an adjustment of weight for your height. A heavily muscled athlete will weigh a lot, and also have a high BMI – but I wouldn’t call him fat… would you?

If you have calculated your BMI already, you might have some idea of where you fit  – but what does it really mean?

The “Normal” Range is based on 18 year old male Armed Forces recruits in New York in the 1970’s. Unless you are an 18 year old male, then perhaps it is not entirely relevant to you. Sure the more important issue is the impact that excess fat cells might have on your health. Studies world-wide have shown that the risks of developing serious diseases that can cripple your lifestyle and shorten your life are more likely if your BMI is more than 35, and especially if it is more than 40. Studies have also shown that people who lose weight return to the risk levels of people at that lower weight, and several diseases have been seen to improve and resolve with weight loss.

More information on these things can be found here.

So, if you have already tried to lose weight by changing your lifestyle and found it just too hard to maintain in the long term…
If you have a Body Mass Index which puts you at higher risk of developing diseases which may compromise your life…
If you already have some of those diseases….
If you are ready to live a life of eating healthy food, eating less food and exercising more…

Then consider weight loss surgery.

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